Word@Work, Let God's Word energise your working day!

Acts

Filter by Chapter Number

Trusting Without A Lifeboat

Acts 27:27-32

For two weeks, Paul's ship, with 276 people on board (Acts 27:37), was battered by huge seas, unrelenting wind and a dark, threatening sky.

Safe Through Obedience

Acts 27:39-44

This was the end of an agonisingly long journey. About three weeks had elapsed since they left Fair Havens in Crete. Lured out of that harbour by a fair southerly wind they soon got caught in the violent north easterly winter wind which drove the ship uncontrollably westwards. After Paul's briefing, passengers and prisoners, sailors and soldiers were all ready to get ashore. Daylight revealed an island with a sandy beach where they decided to run the ship aground.

The Kindness Of The Lord Brings Safety

Acts 28:1-6

The Lord had been kind to Paul and his travelling companions (including Luke), fellow prisoners, passengers, soldiers and sailors. After more than two weeks adrift in a storm at sea, all 276 people on board the Alexandrian cargo/passenger ship were safe, even though the ship had broken up on the sandbar. After swimming towards the sandy beach or clinging to pieces of wreckage, the survivors assembled in the rain on a sandy beach at the northwest of the island of Malta.

The Lord's Kindness Meets Our Needs Abundantly

Acts 28:7-10

In the Lord's kindness, Paul and all the shipwrecked people made it safely to shore. The Maltese islanders were kind, welcoming the survivors and lighting a fire on the beach to warm and dry the sodden seafarers (Acts 28:1-2).

Faith And Fellowship

Acts 28:11-16

After the dramatic shipwreck, Paul, his travelling companions and the military escort spent the winter on Malta. The unpredictably strong winds made commercial shipping impossible until springtime.

The Reason For Being Here

Acts 28:17-20

Paul had arrived in Rome. The journey by ship from Caesarea had taken the best part of five months including a shipwreck and three months in Malta. All the way he had a military escort because Paul had appealed to Caesar's court (

Why Do People Talk Against Jesus?

Acts 28:21-22

Paul, under house arrest in Rome, had invited the Jewish religious leaders to his home. As a committed Jew, he called them his 'brothers', explaining that he loved the Scriptures and his people. He had not broken any Roman law, but had appealed to Caesar because the authorities could not resolve, what they saw as, a religious dispute.

Persuading People About Jesus

Acts 28:23-24

Paul was in Rome because he had appealed to Caesar's court (Acts 26:32) to have a fair trial and to be able to present Christ to the Emperor (

Seeing But Not Perceiving

Acts 28:25-27

Paul's encounter with the Jewish leaders in Rome was to enable them to see how Jesus was the Messiah they had been anticipating (Acts 28:17-22). But, as he spoke, the leaders started arguing with each other.

Some Will Listen - So Speak!

Acts 28:28-31

As we come to the end of Acts, you may have been amazed at what the Lord did in those early days of the church. Astonished too at the courage of Peter, Paul and those who travelled with them. All through the book, the apostles are speaking and taking action in the Name of Jesus.

Pages

BeaconLight
Word@Work
CrossCheck